Day: December 11, 2020

HEALTH
Pregnant People Haven’t Been Part Of Vaccine Trials. Should They Get The Vaccine? : NPR

Health care workers will be among the first to receive a COVID-19 vaccine when they become available. But the vaccines have not been tested on pregnant women, raising questions about whether pregnant and lactating health care workers should get the shots.

Justin Tallis/Pool/Getty Images


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Justin Tallis/Pool/Getty Images

Health care workers will be among the first to receive a COVID-19 vaccine when they become available. But the vaccines have not been tested on pregnant women, raising questions about whether pregnant and lactating health care workers should get the shots.

Justin Tallis/Pool/Getty Images

The Food and Drug Administration is likely soon to authorize distribution of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. But the vaccine trials have so far excluded pregnant people.

Among those first in line to get the vaccine, this is a significant exclusion. Three-quarters of health care workers are women, including more than 85% of nurses. The Centers

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PREGNANCY
Cryptic pregnancy is when a woman well into pregnancy doesn’t know she’s pregnant



Cryptic pregnancies affect 1 in every 475 pregnancies. Getty


© Getty
Cryptic pregnancies affect 1 in every 475 pregnancies. Getty

“I Didn’t Know I Was Pregnant” isn’t just a reality tv show –  it’s a real phenomenon. While rare, it’s completely possible for someone to be unaware that they’re pregnant until late into term or even until they go into labor. This is called a cryptic pregnancy.

“I have seen it for sure, but it’s not incredibly common,” says Dr. Christine Greves, OB-GYN at Orlando Health Winnie Palmer Hospital for Women and Babies. 

For the most part, women with cryptic pregnancies discover they’re pregnant after week 20. This happens in about 1 in every 475 pregnancies.

“They can go through basically half of their pregnancy and not know it,” Greves says.

However, there are rarer cases of cryptic pregnancies – about 1 in 2500 pregnancies – where someone doesn’t realize they’re pregnant until they are literally about to

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HEALTH
SC Shatters Daily Record With Nearly 3,200 COVID-19 Cases | South Carolina News

By MICHELLE LIU, Associated Press/Report for America

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — A week after announcing a record-shattering 2,470 COVID-19 cases in one day, South Carolina health officials said Friday the state had eclipsed that figure by several hundred.

The Department of Health and Environmental Control reported 3,137 confirmed cases and 47 additional deaths Friday. More than 220,000 cases have been recorded in the state since the beginning of the outbreak, and 4,332 South Carolinians have died due to COVID-19, according to the health agency.

The rising numbers come as the state lays out its plan to vaccinate frontline healthcare workers and then eventually the rest of the population. Officials say that with limited supplies, the vaccine isn’t an immediate solution.

“While the arriving vaccine is the light at the end of the tunnel, it will be months before there is enough vaccine available for everyone,” said a statement from Brannon

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HEALTH
Employees under 50 working remotely during coronavirus pandemic struggle to stay motivated: study

Money isn’t enough of a motive to keep young adults engaged at work during a global pandemic, a new report claims. 

Forty-two percent of adults aged between 18 and 49 working from home say it’s been somewhat or very difficult to find motivation since the coronavirus pandemic began, according to a survey published recently by the Pew Research Center. That’s significantly more than the 20% of adults 50 and older who said their motivation was lacking during the new normal.

The survey found there were myriad factors for why young people felt less on track at work while remote including distractions from lack of childcare and working in a more confined space.

42% of adults aged 18 to 49 working from home can't stay motivated, new research suggests. (iStock)

42% of adults aged 18 to 49 working from home can’t stay motivated, new research suggests. (iStock)

Indeed, while more companies are allowing employees to work remotely, a number of those younger than 50 have said it’s been

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HEALTH
Coronavirus News Roundup, December 5-December 11

An independent advisory council’s recommendation on Thursday cleared the way for an “all but certain” U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval that would likely result in health care workers and nursing home residents starting to receive Pfizer/BioNTech’s genetic vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 early next week, the Washington Post reported (12/10/20). The council of experts recommended that the agency provide “emergency use authorization” for the vaccine in adults age 16 and older. Ongoing studies will continue to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the vaccine.  Following FDA approval, an advisory committee to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will vote on its recommendations for which groups to vaccinate first, the story states. “But states have the final say on who gets the first shots and where they are administered,” write Laurie McKinley and Carolyn Y. Johnson. Moderna’s genetic vaccine is also set for review by the FDA in the

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HEALTH
When will teachers be vaccinated? It depends on where you live

Health care workers and residents in long-term care facilities will likely be among the first to have access to a COVID-19 vaccine. Who’s next in line could be from among a pool of essential workers, and educators hope they’re at the top of that list.



A nurse prepares a shot of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at Guy's Hospital in London, Dec. 8, 2020, as the U.K. health authorities rolled out a national mass vaccination program.


© Frank Augstein/AP
A nurse prepares a shot of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at Guy’s Hospital in London, Dec. 8, 2020, as the U.K. health authorities rolled out a national mass vaccination program.

“I would love enough vaccines to be available so teachers and educators and education support personnel could be moved up on the list as quickly as possible,” Michael Lubelfeld, superintendent of the North Shore School District 112 in Highland Park, Illinois, told ABC News.

Lubelfeld’s district, which serves 3,700 students across 10 campuses, opened in September with a hybrid model, with about 85% of students in-person. After eight weeks, the district had

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WEIGHT LOSS
Obese teacher transforms her body with weight loss surgery

  • Ashlee Coleman, from Houston, Texas, has struggled with her weight since childhood, and was always known as the ‘big girl’ in school 
  • She turned to food for comfort, and would binge on donuts and tacos for breakfast, and eat fast food for dinner every day  
  • When she was 18, she tried to change her body naturally by dieting, but despite the healthy eating regimen working initially, she soon piled on weight again 
  • At her heaviest, Ashlee weighed 215lbs, and she found herself unable to keep up with her children, Liam, seven, and Declan, two
  • In 2019, she decided to undergo a vertical gastric sleeve surgery, which cut her stomach size by 80%, and forced her to eat tiny portions 
  • After her recovery, she transformed her diet and took up regular exercise, and she has since lost 70lbs

An obese woman who used to gorge herself on donuts and tacos for

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SKIN CARE
Hawaii’s Next Wave of Natural Skin-Care Brands

It is not altogether surprising that Hawaii is at the forefront of our current golden age of natural skin care, in which botanical face oils and mushroom-infused elixirs abound. Few places on Earth contain such a diversity of plant species, and Hawaiians have been using this bounty — including nutrient-rich varieties such as hibiscus, coconut, ferns and kukui nuts — as a source of nourishment and healing for generations. Indeed, plants have been prized on the islands since the first millennium A.D., when the ancient Polynesians arrived by canoe, bringing with them life-sustaining crops such as taro, breadfruit and sweet potato. And though centuries of colonization have done their best to erode this deep-rooted connection to the natural world, it has endured. In fact, for many of the founders of the latest wave of Hawaii-based skin-care lines, using locally sourced botanical ingredients is simply common sense, part of a reciprocal,

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HEALTH
Doctors in Birmingham plead for public help to ‘keep people alive until the vaccine is here’

With intensive care units filling fast and COVID-19 case numbers surging across the state, doctors and public health workers in Birmingham asked Alabamians to take the virus seriously and be as cautious as possible and limit the size of Christmas celebrations.

“I want to make a plea to the community,” said Dr. Mark Wilson, Jefferson County health officer, in an online press conference Friday with doctors from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. “We’re in the holiday season. We understand that sacrifice is needed for success.

“This year, I ask that you make just one more sacrifice. Please have a Christmas celebration with family just inside your household.”

On Wednesday, the Jefferson County Health Department reported that there were only 13 available ICU beds in the county. The Alabama Hospital Association on Thursday reported that only 7 percent of ICU beds were available statewide, and none in Montgomery.

Wilson said

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HEALTH
VA Announces Plan for COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution


As vaccine supplies increase, additional veterans will receive vaccinations based on age, existing health problems and other factors that increase the risk of severe illness or death from COVID-19. The vaccines will be offered at no cost to all service members enrolled in VA health care, it said.

“VA is well prepared and positioned to begin COVID-19 vaccinations,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie in a press statement. “Our ultimate goal is to offer it to all veterans and employees who want to be vaccinated.”

‘Herculean effort’

The VA submitted an order for 73,000 doses of the Pfizer vaccine and an additional 122,000 doses of the Moderna vaccine to be distributed once it has authorization from the Food and Drug Administration.

“It is not an adequate amount,” said Richard Stone, M.D., executive in charge at the VA’s Veterans Health Administration at a recent Senate hearing. “This will be a long process

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