Tag: Coronavirus

HEALTH
First U.S. Coronavirus Vaccines Set to Be Delivered Monday

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First U.S. Coronavirus Vaccines Set to Be Delivered Monday

Gen. Gustave F. Perna, chief officer of Operation Warp Speed, said boxes of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine were being readied for shipment with an emphasis on quality control.

“We have realized the greatest public-private partnership in modern times: Doctors, scientists, researchers, factory workers, logisticians and hundreds more have all come together for a singular purpose. That purpose: Save lives and end the pandemic. We checked our egos at the door. We worked collectively to solve the problem. And we have achieved success as was identified last night by the F.D.A. when they approved E.U.A. of the Pfizer vaccine.” “Make no mistake, distribution has begun. Right now, boxes are being packed and loaded with vaccine with emphasis on quality control. Within the next 24 hours, they will begin

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HEALTH
Coronavirus vaccine expected in Oklahoma during coming week

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The first doses of the Pfizer coronavirus vaccine are expected as soon in Oklahoma during the coming week, perhaps by Wednesday, the Oklahoma State Department of Health said following emergency approval of the vaccine by the Federal Drug Administration on Friday.

The state expects about 33,000 initial doses of the vaccine, according to health commissioner Dr. Lance Frye.

“This is great news, and we’re optimistic about the arrival of the vaccine in Oklahoma,” Frye said in the statement. “Oklahomans should feel confident in receiving this vaccine when it becomes available to them.”


Side effects from the vaccine can include pain at injection site, shivering, fatigue or fever, said Dr. Doug Drevets, chief of infectious disease at OU Health.

“These vaccines have very few serious side effects, side effects so bad that you might have to take day off from work,” Drevets said.

Health care workers, long-term

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HEALTH
Coronavirus outbreaks at Foster Farms plants make a comeback

Foster Farms, one of the West Coast’s largest producers of poultry, is facing scrutiny for new clusters of coronavirus infections at its facilities in California’s Central Valley, which follow a months-long, deadly outbreak this year.



a car driving down a factory: Foster Farms is one of the West Coast's largest poultry producers. Above, its Livingston, Calif., plant in 2013. (Debbie Noda / Modesto Bee)


© (Debbie Noda / Modesto Bee)
Foster Farms is one of the West Coast’s largest poultry producers. Above, its Livingston, Calif., plant in 2013. (Debbie Noda / Modesto Bee)

California-based Foster Farms has reported that at least 193 people at its Cherry Avenue plant in Fresno have tested positive for the coronavirus over a recent two-week period, as have 12 people at a nearby plant on Belgravia Avenue. And a union official said at least 37 workers at the company’s Livingston complex in Merced County have tested positive since Nov. 30.

With about 1,000 people working at the Cherry Avenue facility in Fresno, that penciled out to about 20% of that plant’s workers testing

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HEALTH
Coronavirus deaths highest in US in rural Republican-leaning county

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COVID-19 has killed 20 people in Gove County, Kansas, which has only 2,600 residents. Sharon DuBois lost her mother to the virus.

USA TODAY

QUINTER, Kansas — Sitting in the front seat of a red pickup as wind-whipped sorghum husks fly down Main Street like snowflakes, Ivy Charles fingers the white surgical mask slipped down beneath her chin.

“He was a puzzle piece who can never be replaced,” she says, tears welling into her tired eyes. “He was supposed to get better. We weren’t expecting him to die.”

Just over a month ago, the now-rampaging coronavirus pandemic tore through this rural town of 1,000 and surrounding Gove County, killing 20 residents. Among them was Charles’ father, Edward “Mac” McElhaney, 78.

Ivy Charles stares down Main Street in Quinter, Kansas, following the coronavirus death of her father. (Photo: Trevor Hughes, Trevor Hughes-USA TODAY NETWORK)

Here, where most everyone knows most

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HEALTH
Coronavirus: Daily update

Here are five things you need to know about the coronavirus pandemic on Saturday. We’ll have another update for you on Sunday.

1. US approves Pfizer vaccine

The US has become the latest country to approve the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine for emergency use. The Food and Drug Administration granted approval after intense pressure from the Trump administration. President Donald Trump said the first vaccines would take place “in less than 24 hours”. The virus has killed more than 292,000 in the US.





© BBC


2. How will mass vaccination work in the UK?

The UK was the first country in the western world to approve the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine and has already begun the rollout of millions of jabs. The vaccine, which is one of several shots the country has bought supplies of, is manufactured in Belgium and has to be kept at -70C which creates plenty of logistical difficulties in getting

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HEALTH
FDA Grants Emergency Use Authorization for Pfizer-BioNTech Coronavirus Vaccine | National News

The Food and Drug Administration on Friday granted an emergency use authorization for the coronavirus vaccine developed by Pfizer and BioNTech, marking a major milestone in the pandemic that has claimed close to 300,000 American lives.

“It is nothing short of a medical miracle to have FDA authorization of a vaccine for COVID-19 just over 11 months since the virus was made known to the world,” Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said in a statement.

The highly-anticipated approval allows vaccine shipments to begin. However, shots cannot be administered until a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advisory committee votes Saturday on whether to recommend the vaccine for the public and if certain groups of people should not receive the shot. CDC Director Robert Redfield would then need to sign off on the committee’s recommendation.

Azar on Friday said that the first vaccinations could start Monday or Tuesday. Britain,

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HEALTH
FDA authorizes the first coronavirus vaccine, a rare moment of hope in the deadly pandemic

The Food and Drug Administration on Friday gave emergency use authorization to the nation’s first coronavirus vaccine, launching what scientists hope will be a critical counteroffensive against a pathogen that has killed more than 290,000 Americans, shredded the nation’s social and political fabric and devastated the economy.



a close up of a bottle


© Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images


The historic authorization of the vaccine from Pfizer and BioNTech for people age 16 and older, just 336 days after the genetic blueprint of a novel coronavirus was shared online by Chinese scientists, sets in motion a highly choreographed and complex distribution process aimed at speeding vaccines throughout the United States to curb the pandemic.

The FDA action came after White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows on Friday told FDA commissioner Stephen Hahn to be prepared to submit his resignation if the agency did not clear the vaccine by day’s end, according to people familiar with the

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HEALTH
Coronavirus Vaccine Transportation Will Be A Huge Logistical Challenge : NPR

Food and Drug Administration building is shown Thursday, in Silver Spring, Md. A U.S. government advisory panel convened to decide whether to endorse emergency use of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine to help conquer the outbreak that has killed close to 300,000 Americans.

Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP


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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Food and Drug Administration building is shown Thursday, in Silver Spring, Md. A U.S. government advisory panel convened to decide whether to endorse emergency use of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine to help conquer the outbreak that has killed close to 300,000 Americans.

Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

As the FDA nears authorization of coronavirus vaccines, a huge logistical challenge looms. That is, transporting and distributing the vaccines quickly and efficiently to those who need it most all around the world.

It’s a complex task that will involve not only shipping companies like FedEx and UPS, but also airlines better known for carrying

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HEALTH
Employees under 50 working remotely during coronavirus pandemic struggle to stay motivated: study

Money isn’t enough of a motive to keep young adults engaged at work during a global pandemic, a new report claims. 

Forty-two percent of adults aged between 18 and 49 working from home say it’s been somewhat or very difficult to find motivation since the coronavirus pandemic began, according to a survey published recently by the Pew Research Center. That’s significantly more than the 20% of adults 50 and older who said their motivation was lacking during the new normal.

The survey found there were myriad factors for why young people felt less on track at work while remote including distractions from lack of childcare and working in a more confined space.

42% of adults aged 18 to 49 working from home can't stay motivated, new research suggests. (iStock)

42% of adults aged 18 to 49 working from home can’t stay motivated, new research suggests. (iStock)

Indeed, while more companies are allowing employees to work remotely, a number of those younger than 50 have said it’s been

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HEALTH
Coronavirus News Roundup, December 5-December 11

An independent advisory council’s recommendation on Thursday cleared the way for an “all but certain” U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval that would likely result in health care workers and nursing home residents starting to receive Pfizer/BioNTech’s genetic vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 early next week, the Washington Post reported (12/10/20). The council of experts recommended that the agency provide “emergency use authorization” for the vaccine in adults age 16 and older. Ongoing studies will continue to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the vaccine.  Following FDA approval, an advisory committee to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will vote on its recommendations for which groups to vaccinate first, the story states. “But states have the final say on who gets the first shots and where they are administered,” write Laurie McKinley and Carolyn Y. Johnson. Moderna’s genetic vaccine is also set for review by the FDA in the

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